Latest Tweets:

Christmas Day Porter brewing

Christmas Day Porter brewing

nevver:

Mischief Night

how much does devil’s night + michigan have to do with d12 and eminem popularizing it? just wondering.

nevver:

Mischief Night

how much does devil’s night + michigan have to do with d12 and eminem popularizing it? just wondering.

Putin is visiting the Netherlands. 
via Buzzfeed

Putin is visiting the Netherlands. 

via Buzzfeed

joemartinez:

sealegslegssea:

this is so cool

Harry Belafonte as Jules & Muhammad Ali as himself?? Amazing. 

(Source: rocknrollercoaster)

*17
soxiam:

“Or… how about this. We can just show HSB and RGB and Lab and CMYK and Hex mode all at the same time. What do you guys think?”

:)

soxiam:

“Or… how about this. We can just show HSB and RGB and Lab and CMYK and Hex mode all at the same time. What do you guys think?”

:)

buzzfeed:

Happy Valentine’s Day…
[via]

buzzfeed:

Happy Valentine’s Day…

[via]

(via fastcompany)

joemartinez:

cheekychip:

Is this the future of the beautiful game?

That’s the question Jogabo is asking with their new Foursquare-esque app for footy. The goal is clear: find games in your city in a simple, effortless manner.

The idea grabbed our interest, but the video seized our attention. More specifically, Jogabo connects you with the players in your city and allows you to find, organize and share games.” We’ve downloaded the app, and we like where this is going. Maybe you’ll do the same so we can get kicking. [Posted by Eric]

LOVE THIS!!  NYC please!

Nice

really-shit:

Homework table | Tomas Kral

One of the best products I’ve seen.

(via fastcompany)

soxiam:

“Why don’t you just let the users decide? Just make it an option.”

Yep

soxiam:

“Why don’t you just let the users decide? Just make it an option.”

Yep

"If you asked people in 1989 what they needed to make their life better, it was unlikely that they would have said that a decentralized network of information nodes that are linked using hypertext."

http://farmerandfarmer.org/mastery/builder.html (via cdixon)

*2
I Hate This Graphic and All Its Incarnations
So the amendment was passed.  It’s lame.  Everyone on facebook in North Carolina in my age range thinks that it’s lame.  We need to really the troops.  Okay, whatever, I get that. Here’s this thing and it’s fun. It’s fun to post that graphic that correlates University presence to voting trends on Amendment One in North Carolina. It’s also way too easy and a little worrying.  If I learned one thing in college statistics, it’s that correlation does not equal causation.  
What I see is a map indicative of a divide between two very different cultures. In this case, they are differentiated by their homes (cities + suburbs vs rural areas).  
Don’t get me wrong: supporting Amendment One, in my opinion, is discriminatory. I don’t subscribe to that moral agenda.  I also don’t want to act like I’m better than those opposition because I went to college and also happen to believe what I believe.  
This graphic and subsequent sharing and the “we get it and they don’t” attitude smacks of haughtiness, because we were lucky enough (please don’t forget we were lucky) to receive a post-secondary education and now make “better” decisions regarding politics. Even if that’s not the intention, that’s how it comes off and that’s what it seems to imply.

I Hate This Graphic and All Its Incarnations

So the amendment was passed.  It’s lame.  Everyone on facebook in North Carolina in my age range thinks that it’s lame.  We need to really the troops.  Okay, whatever, I get that. Here’s this thing and it’s fun. It’s fun to post that graphic that correlates University presence to voting trends on Amendment One in North Carolina. It’s also way too easy and a little worrying.  If I learned one thing in college statistics, it’s that correlation does not equal causation.  

What I see is a map indicative of a divide between two very different cultures. In this case, they are differentiated by their homes (cities + suburbs vs rural areas).  

Don’t get me wrong: supporting Amendment One, in my opinion, is discriminatory. I don’t subscribe to that moral agenda.  I also don’t want to act like I’m better than those opposition because I went to college and also happen to believe what I believe.  

This graphic and subsequent sharing and the “we get it and they don’t” attitude smacks of haughtiness, because we were lucky enough (please don’t forget we were lucky) to receive a post-secondary education and now make “better” decisions regarding politics. Even if that’s not the intention, that’s how it comes off and that’s what it seems to imply.

theatlantic:

The Soft Bigotry of ‘Kony 2012’

The much-circulated campaign subtly reinforces an idea that has been one of Africa’s biggest disasters: that well-meaning Westerners need to come in and fix it. Africans, in this telling, are helpless victims, and Westerners are the heroes. It’s part of a long tradition of Western advocacy that has, for centuries, adopted some form of white man’s burden, treating African people as cared for only to the extent that Westerners care, their problems solvable only to the extent that Westerners solve them, and surely damned unless we can save them. First it was with missionaries, then “civilizing” missions, and finally the ultimate end of white paternalism, which was placing Africans under the direct Western control of imperialism. And while imperialism may have collapsed 50 years ago, that mentality persists, because it is rewarding and ennobling to feel needed and to believe you are doing something good.
“African solutions for African problems” isn’t just a State Department slogan, and it isn’t about promoting African leadership, although that’s certainly important. Africans are already leaders. There are many reasons for Africa’s amazing rise over the last ten years, but one of the biggest has been African leadership. It’s not a coincidence that the 200 years of Western leadership in Africa were some of the continent’s worst. Africans have proven time and again that they’re better at fixing African problems. While helping is always good, and it’s great that people care, what Kony 2012 ignores is that Africans are not “invisible” and the last thing they need is for a bunch of Westerners to parachute in and take over (again). We sometimes mistake our position at the top of the global food chain as evidence that we’re more capable, that our power will extend into complicated and far-away societies, that we’ll be better at fixing their problems than they are. This assumption, both well-meaning and self-glorifying, has led us into disaster after disaster after disaster.
Read more. [Image: Invisible Children]

theatlantic:

The Soft Bigotry of ‘Kony 2012’

The much-circulated campaign subtly reinforces an idea that has been one of Africa’s biggest disasters: that well-meaning Westerners need to come in and fix it. Africans, in this telling, are helpless victims, and Westerners are the heroes. It’s part of a long tradition of Western advocacy that has, for centuries, adopted some form of white man’s burden, treating African people as cared for only to the extent that Westerners care, their problems solvable only to the extent that Westerners solve them, and surely damned unless we can save them. First it was with missionaries, then “civilizing” missions, and finally the ultimate end of white paternalism, which was placing Africans under the direct Western control of imperialism. And while imperialism may have collapsed 50 years ago, that mentality persists, because it is rewarding and ennobling to feel needed and to believe you are doing something good.

African solutions for African problems” isn’t just a State Department slogan, and it isn’t about promoting African leadership, although that’s certainly important. Africans are already leaders. There are many reasons for Africa’s amazing rise over the last ten years, but one of the biggest has been African leadership. It’s not a coincidence that the 200 years of Western leadership in Africa were some of the continent’s worst. Africans have proven time and again that they’re better at fixing African problems. While helping is always good, and it’s great that people care, what Kony 2012 ignores is that Africans are not “invisible” and the last thing they need is for a bunch of Westerners to parachute in and take over (again). We sometimes mistake our position at the top of the global food chain as evidence that we’re more capable, that our power will extend into complicated and far-away societies, that we’ll be better at fixing their problems than they are. This assumption, both well-meaning and self-glorifying, has led us into disaster after disaster after disaster.

Read more. [Image: Invisible Children]

*87

Design nerd friends should like this.

zachklein:

Scorekeeper’s interaction design is air tight.

(Source: youtube.com)

parislemon:

This is actually the craziest chart about Apple following their insane earnings today.
There is exactly one company on that entire list that is not an oil and gas company. And they’re not that far from the top. 

parislemon:

This is actually the craziest chart about Apple following their insane earnings today.

There is exactly one company on that entire list that is not an oil and gas company. And they’re not that far from the top. 

(via dpstyles)